ENGLISHMiscellaneous English Grammar

USAGE OF VERB ‘WANT’ (EXPLAINED IN HINDI & ENGLISH)

VERB ‘WANT’ (EXPLAINED IN HINDI)

Verb ‘want’ का प्रयोग इच्छाओं को व्यक्त करने के लिए औरआवश्यकताओं  को बताने के लिए किया जाता है; जैसे

इच्छाएं (Wishes/desires)

a) What do you want for dinner tonight?
b) Do you want a cup of coffee?
c) All they want is some sleep.

NOTE-I: बातचीत में लोग कभी-कभी verb ‘want’ की present continuous और past continuous form का प्रयोग करते हैं; परन्तु मानक इंग्लिश (standard English) में ये अशुद्ध होता है; e.g.

INCORRECT: I think someone is wanting to speak to you.
CORRECT: I think someone wants to speak to you.

INCORRECT: They were all wanting to be on the team.
CORRECT: They all wanted to be on the team.

NOTE-II: लेकिन standard English में verb ‘want’ का प्रयोग present perfect continuous, past  perfect continuous और the future continuous tenses में शुद्ध होता है; जैसे

a) Ratan had been wanting to resign for months.
b) These new phones are getting very popular – soon everyone will be wanting one.

NOTE-III: अगर verb ‘want’ के बाद कोई action दिया हुआ हो तो उसका to-infinitive (TO + V1) रूप प्रयोग किया जाता है; जैसे

a) They wanted to go shopping.
b) I want to ask you a favour, Sarita.
c) They want their son to go to a good university

NOTE-IV: नकारात्मक वाक्यों (negative sentences) में अगर to-infinitive का प्रयोग करना हो तो शब्द ‘not’ को TO और V1 के मध्य अथवा उसके पहले नहीं रखा जाता, बल्कि verb ‘want’ को ही negative बनाया जाता है; जैसे

INCORRECT: I want to not discuss this. OR I want not to discuss this.
CORRECT: I don’t want to discuss this.

INCORRECT: He wanted to not come. OR He wanted not to come.
CORRECT: He didn’t want to come.

NOTE-V: To-infinitive clause की अपेक्षा हम कभी-कभी don’t want के बाद शब्द TO को बिना V1 के प्रयोग में लाते हैं; जैसे

ये कहने की अपेक्षा ‘I was asked to go, but I didn’t want to go.’ हम कहते हैं ‘I was asked to go, but I didn’t want to’.

लेकिन ये कहना अशुद्ध होता है ‘I was asked to go, but I didn’t want it’  अथवा ‘I was asked  to go, but I  didn’t want’.

More examples:

a) I could do it faster, but I just don’t want to.
b) He should not be forced to eat it if he doesn’t want to.

NOTE-VI: Verb ‘want’ के बाद ‘that-clause’ का प्रयोग नहीं होता; जैसे

INCORRECT: I want him that he should learn to read.
CORRECT: I want him to learn to read.

INCORRECT: The little girl wanted that I should come and play with her.
CORRECT: The little girl wanted me to come and play with her.

INCORRECT: I want that he should learn to read
CORRECT: I want him to learn to read.

NOTE-VII: जब हम ये कहते हैं कि कोई व्यक्ति किसी कार्य को बहुत जल्द ही करने वाला है तो हम verb ‘want’ का प्रयोग नहीं करते, बल्कि हम ‘be about to’ का प्रयोग करते हैं; जैसे

INCORRECT: I just wanted to leave when the phone rang.
CORRECT: I was just about to leave when the phone rang.

INCORRECT: Her father wants to retire soon.
CORRECT: Her father is about to retire soon.

INCORRECT: I can’t talk now, because I want to go to work soon.
CORRECT: I can’t talk now, because I’m just about to go to work.

NOTE-VIII: जब कोई बात कष्टकर होती है तो verb ‘want’ के बाद किसी gerund (ing form) का प्रयोग भी शुद्ध होता है और किसी infinitive (to + V1) का भी; जैसे

I don’t want other people telling me how to spend my money.
= I don’t want other people to tell me how to spend my money.

आवश्यकताएं (Needs)
ये कहने के लिए कि कोई बात आवश्यक है अथवा किसी कार्य का किया जाना आवश्यक है तो verb ‘want’ के साथ gerund (ing form) का use किया जा सकता है; जैसे

a) Your hair wants cutting.
b) That cupboard wants clearing out.
c) The kitchen wants painting.
d) We’ve got a few jobs that want doing in the garden.
e) The windows wanted cleaning.

NOTE: verb ‘want’ के इस अर्थ में इसके साथ to-infinitive का प्रयोग अशुद्ध होता है; जैसे

INCORRECT: We’ve got a few jobs that want to be done in the garden.
CORRECT: We’ve got a few jobs that want doing in the garden.

1. WH-words के साथ verb ‘want’ का use कैसे किया जाता है
Verb ‘want’ से पहले WH-words जैसे कि what, when, whenever, wherever, whoever का प्रयोग भी किया जा सकता है. ऐसी स्थिति में verb ‘want’ के बाद infinitive ‘to’ का प्रयोग हमेशा आवश्यक नहीं होता; जैसे

You don’t have to stay for the whole lecture. You can leave whenever you want.
=  You don’t have to stay for the whole lecture. You can leave whenever you want to.

Would you like some of these carrots from our garden? – Take what you want.
= Would you like some of these carrots from our garden? – Take what you want to.

2. IF के साथ verb ‘want’ का use कैसे किया जाता है
Verb ‘want’ के साथ ‘if’ वाले वाक्यों में infinitive ‘to’ का प्रयोग आवश्यक नहीं होता; जैसे

She can park her car at our house, if she wants.
= She can park her car at our house, if she wants.

NOTE: परन्तु नकारात्मक (negative) वाक्यों में verb ‘want’ के बाद में infinitive ‘to’ का प्रयोग आवश्यक होता है; जैसे

INCORRECT: He doesn’t have to stay the night if he doesn’t want.
CORRECT: He doesn’t have to stay the night if he doesn’t want to.

For more chapters/topics on English Grammar read the following book authored by me.

Link for buying the above book

CLICK HERE TO BUY

For English Practice Sets on various topics read the following book authored by me.

Link for buying the above book

CLICK HERE TO BUY

VERB ‘WANT’ (EXPLAINED IN ENGLISH)

We use the verb ‘want’ to talk about wishes/desires and needs; e.g.

Wishes/desires

a) What do you want for dinner tonight?
b) Do you want a cup of coffee?
c) All they want is some sleep.

NOTE-I: In conversation people sometimes use present continuous and past continuous forms  of ‘want’ but it’s incorrect in standard English; e.g.

INCORRECT: I think someone is wanting to speak to you.
CORRECT: I think someone wants to speak to you.

INCORRECT: They were all wanting to be on the team.
CORRECT: They all wanted to be on the team.

NOTE-II: However, verb ‘want’ can be used in the present perfect continuous, the past  perfect continuous and the future continuous in standard English; e.g.

a) Ratan had been wanting to resign for months.
b) These new phones are getting very popular – soon everyone will be wanting one.

NOTE-III: If it’s an action after ‘want’ we use the to-infinitive (TO + V1); e.g.

a) They wanted to go shopping.
b) I want to ask you a favour, Sarita.
c) They want their son to go to a good university

NOTE-IV: When we need to use to-infinitive in negative sentences we don’t use the word NOT between TO and V1 or before it, rather we make the verb ‘want’ in the negative; e.g.

INCORRECT: I want to not discuss this. OR I want not to discuss this.
CORRECT: I don’t want to discuss this.

INCORRECT: He wanted to not come. OR He wanted not to come.
CORRECT: He didn’t want to come.

NOTE-V: Instead of using a to-infinitive clause, you can sometimes use ‘to’ on its own after  don’t want; e.g.

Instead of ‘I was asked to go, but I didn’t want to go.’ You say ‘I was asked to go, but I didn’t  want to’.

But it’s incorrect to say ‘I was asked to go, but I didn’t want it’  or ‘I was asked  to go, but I  didn’t want’.

More examples:

a) I could do it faster, but I just don’t want to.
b) He should not be forced to eat it if he doesn’t want to.

NOTE-VI: We don’t use a ‘that-clause’ after ‘want’; e.g.

INCORRECT: I want him that he should learn to read.
CORRECT: I want him to learn to read.

INCORRECT: The little girl wanted that I should come and play with her.
CORRECT: The little girl wanted me to come and play with her.

INCORRECT: I want that he should learn to read
CORRECT: I want him to learn to read.

NOTE-VII: We don’t use the verb ‘want’ to say that someone is going to do something very soon; rather we use ‘be about to’; e.g.

INCORRECT: I just wanted to leave when the phone rang.
CORRECT: I was just about to leave when the phone rang.

INCORRECT: Her father wants to retire soon.
CORRECT: Her father is about to retire soon.

INCORRECT: I can’t talk now, because I want to go to work soon.
CORRECT: I can’t talk now, because I’m just about to go to work.

NOTE-VIII: When something is annoying or causes problems we can use either a gerund or an infinitive after the verb ‘want’; e.g.

I don’t want other people telling me how to spend my money.
= I don’t want other people to tell me how to spend my money.

Needs
We can use ‘want’ with the -ing form of a verb to say that something is necessary or should be done.

a) Your hair wants cutting.
b) That cupboard wants clearing out.
c) The kitchen wants painting.
d) We’ve got a few jobs that want doing in the garden.
e) The windows wanted cleaning.

NOTE: In this meaning of ‘want’ we can’t use a to-infinitive; e.g.

INCORRECT: We’ve got a few jobs that want to be done in the garden.
CORRECT: We’ve got a few jobs that want doing in the garden.

1. WANT with ‘WH-words’
We can use WH-WORDS such as what, when, whenever, wherever, whoever before  ‘want’. In such cases, it is often not necessary to use the infinitive ‘to’ after want; e.g.

You don’t have to stay for the whole lecture. You can leave whenever you want.
=  You don’t have to stay for the whole lecture. You can leave whenever you want to.

Would you like some of these carrots from our garden? – Take what you want.
= Would you like some of these carrots from our garden? – Take what you want to.

2. WANT with IF
In statements with IF, it is often not necessary to use the infinitive ‘to’ after want; e.g.

She can park her car at our house, if she wants.
= She can park her car at our house, if she wants to.

NOTE: However, use of the infinitive ‘to after ‘want’ in negative clauses with IF is necessary; e.g.

INCORRECT: He doesn’t have to stay the night if he doesn’t want.
CORRECT: He doesn’t have to stay the night if he doesn’t want to.

For more chapters/topics on English Grammar read the following book authored by me.

Link for buying the above book

CLICK HERE TO BUY

For English Practice Sets on various topics read the following book authored by me.

Link for buying the above book

CLICK HERE TO BUY

Previous post

'WHILE' and 'WHEREAS' (EXPLAINED IN HINDI & ENGLISH)

Next post

DATES OF VARIOUS EXAMS IN DSSSB

Maha Gupta

Maha Gupta

Founder of www.examscomp.com and guiding aspirants on SSC exam affairs since 2010 when objective pattern of exams was introduced first in SSC. Also the author of the following books:

1. Maha English Grammar (for Competitive Exams)
2. Maha English Practice Sets (for Competitive Exams)

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *